Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Women’s health & midwifery
Menstrual cycle changes after COVID-19 vaccination or infection: not two sides of the same coin
  1. Antonio Simone Laganà1,
  2. David Lukanovič2,
  3. Marco Noventa3,
  4. Chrysoula Margioula-Siarkou4,
  5. Sanja Terzic5,
  6. Vito Chiantera1
  1. 1Unit of Gynecologic Oncology, ARNAS "Civico – Di Cristina – Benfratelli", Department of Health Promotion, Mother and Child Care, Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties (PROMISE), University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
  2. 2Department of Gynecology, Division of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Ljubljana Medical Center, Ljubljana, Slovenia
  3. 3Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Padua, Padua, Italy
  4. 42nd Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hippokration General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
  5. 5Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Nazarbayev University, Astana, Kazakhstan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Antonio Simone Laganà, Unit of Gynecologic Oncology, ARNAS "Civico – Di Cristina – Benfratelli", Department of Health Promotion, Mother and Child Care, Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties (PROMISE), University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; antoniosimone.lagana{at}unipa.it

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Commentary on: Wang S, Mortazavi J, Hart JE, et al. A prospective study of the association between SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 vaccination with changes in usual menstrual cycle characteristics. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2022 Jul 13;227(5):739.e1–739.e11. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2022.07.003. Epub ahead of print.

Implications for practice and research

  • Physicians should inform that COVID-19 vaccination is associated with an increased risk of a longer menstrual period during the first 6 months postvaccination, especially among women who had irregular, short or long prevaccination menstruation.

  • Future long-term follow-ups should evaluate menstrual cycle patterns in reproductive age and postmenopausal women who underwent COVID-19 vaccination.

Context

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly shaped several elements of our lives, including healthcare policy.1 Several governments solicited campaigns to increase the vaccination rate of healthcare providers, fragile patients and the general population …

View Full Text

Footnotes

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.