Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Mental health
Walking in nature can help depression
  1. Jacinta Brinsley1,
  2. Simon Rosenbaum2
  1. 1Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition & Activity (ARENA), University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  2. 2UNSW, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jacinta Brinsley, Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition & Activity (ARENA), University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; Jacinta.Brinsley{at}unisa.edu.au

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Commentary on: Watkins-Martin K, Bolanis D, Richard-Devantoy S, et al. The effects of walking in nature on negative and positive affect in adult psychiatric outpatients with major depressive disorder: A randomized-controlled study. J Affect Disord 2022;318:291–8. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2022.08.121.

Implications for practice and research

  • Walking is an accessible and low-cost intervention that does not require specialised equipment or staff. Promoting walking, ideally in nature as part of routine mental healthcare, should be encouraged.

  • Consideration should be given to the accessibility of natural spaces in geographically and culturally diverse settings and how this may impact the relationship between physical activity, mental health and the natural environment.

Context

Physical activity improves mental and physical health in people with depression.1 Interventions that target modifiable lifestyle behaviours, such as …

View Full Text

Footnotes

  • Twitter @simon_rosenbaum

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.