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Learning disabilities
Sleep problems in adults with learning disabilities: the compelling need for objective and methodologically consistent studies
  1. Valentina Alfonsi1,
  2. Luigi De Gennaro1,2
  1. 1Department of Psychology, University of Rome La Sapienza, Roma, Italy
  2. 2Body and Action Lab, Santa Lucia Foundation, Roma, Italy
  1. Correspondence to Dr Luigi De Gennaro, Department of Psychology, University of Rome La Sapienza, Roma, Lazio, Italy; luigi.degennaro{at}uniroma1.it

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Commentary on: Shanahan P, Ahmad S, Smith K, et al. The prevalence of sleep disorders in adults with learning disabilities: a systematic review. Br J Learn Disabil 2022, 1–24. doi: 10.1111/bld.12480

Implications for practice and research

  • An in-depth understanding of sleep disturbances or sleep alterations in adults with learning disabilities allows for planning appropriate and timely intervention programmes.

  • Future studies should systematically explore the relationship between sleep disorders and learning disabilities in adults.

Context

Literature has consistently reported a high frequency of sleep disorders or sleep alterations in adults with learning disabilities (8.5%–34.1%),1 ranging from difficulties in falling asleep to sleep loss, daytime sleepiness or altered sleep behaviours. A few studies clearly stated the criteria for defining the presence of sleep problems in this population. Further, there is substantial methodological heterogeneity in the current research. The systematic review by Shanahan et al …

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @luigidegennar

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.