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Child health
Physical activity during childhood cancer treatment: survivors want it, parents want it, peers can facilitate it
  1. David Mizrahi1,
  2. Alexandra Martiniuk1,2,3,4
  1. 1The Daffodil Centre, The University of Sydney, a joint venture with Cancer Council NSW, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2Office of the Chief Scientist, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  3. 3Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  4. 4School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr David Mizrahi, Daffodil Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; david.mizrahi{at}sydney.edu.au

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Commentary on: Petersen NN, Larsen HB, Pouplier A, Schmidt-Andersen P, Thorsteinsson T, Schmiegelow K, Fridh MK. Childhood cancer survivors' and their parents' experiences with participation in a physical and social intervention during cancer treatment: A RESPECT study. J Adv Nurs. 2022 Aug 8. doi: 10.1111/jan.15381. Epub 2022 Aug 8.

Implications for practice and research

  • Parents may not prioritise physical activity during hospitalisation for childhood cancer, however, when children receive exercise guidance and social support, parents will more likely encourage their child to be active post-treatment.

  • Future research should seek to understand effective ways to implement exercise interventions that include peer support for this population.

Context

Survival rates for childhood cancer are increasing, however, the cost of cure is high with most survivors at-risk for developing comorbidities.1 To combat this, the ‘exercise oncology’ evidence base is rapidly growing. Adult cancers have prescriptive guidelines endorsing …

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @davemiz_EP

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.