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Diagnosis, gender and age predict context of care provision for older adults towards the end of life
  1. Laura Green
  1. Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Manchester Faculty of Biology Medicine and Health, Manchester, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Laura Green, Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Manchester Faculty of Biology Medicine and Health, Manchester M13 9PL, UK; Laura.green-3{at}manchester.ac.uk

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Commentary on: Teggi, D. Care homes as hospices for the prevalent form of dying: An analysis of long-term care provision towards the end of life in England. Soc Sci Med 2020;260:113150.

Implications for practice and research

  • Current end-of-life care (EOLC) policy needs to recognise the predictors of long-term care (LTC) provision and address the central role of care homes for older people with non-malignant conditions.

  • Future research needs to focus on the development of public health models of LTC and EOLC.

Context

For older people in the UK, death is often preceded by a protracted period of ill health.1 This study investigated patterns of LTC and EOLC provision in old age by examining the relationship between chronic health conditions, place of care and dying. Older adults who receive LTC in the period prior to death belonged …

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @heblau

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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