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Nursing issues
Patients with hospital-onset sepsis are less likely to receive sepsis bundle care than those with community-onset sepsis
  1. Aneesh Basheer
  1. Departments of General Medicine and Medical Education, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Pondicherry, India
  1. Correspondence to Professor Aneesh Basheer, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Pondicherry, India; basheeraneesh{at}gmail.com

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Commentary on: Baghdadi JD, Wong MD, Uslan DZ et al. Adherence to the SEP-1 Sepsis Bundle in Hospital-Onset v. Community-Onset Sepsis: a Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Study. J Gen Intern Med 2020; Feb 10. doi: 10.1007/s11606-020-05653-0. [Epub ahead of print]

Implications for practice and research

  • Patients with hospital-onset sepsis are less likely to receive sepsis bundle adherent care compared with community-onset sepsis, reasons for which are multifactorial.

  • High-quality prospective cohort studies are needed to explore disparities in adherence, factors affecting non-adherence and its effect on mortality.

Context

Adherence to sepsis bundles is associated with good outcomes in community-onset sepsis.1 Although evidence for similar benefit is lacking in hospital-onset sepsis, a uniform protocol such as SEP-1 (Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Early Management Bundle-1) is recommended for all types of sepsis. Limited data suggest disparity in adherence to SEP-1 between community-onset sepsis and hospital-onset sepsis, with …

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @basheeraneesh

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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