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Child health
Nociceptor-stimulating devices can help reduce pain, anxiety and fear in children requiring regular injections
  1. Marion Waite1,
  2. Emma Jane Iness2
  1. 1 Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK
  2. 2 Oxford School of Nursing and Midwifery, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK
  1. Correspondence to Marion Waite, Oxford School of Nursing and Midwifery, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0BP, UK; mwaite{at}brookes.ac.uk

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Commentary on: Canbulat Sahiner N, Turkmen AS, Acikgoz A, et al. Effectiveness of two different methods for pain reduction during insulin injection in children with Type 1 Diabetes: Buzzy and ShotBlocker. Worldviews Evid Based Nurs [EPub ahead of print 11 Oct 2018].

Implications for practice and research

  • Use of ShotBlocker or Buzzy during insulin administration was effective in reducing self-reported, parental and observer assessments of pain in comparison with no intervention.

  • ShotBlocker or Buzzy was effective in lowering self-reported, parental and observer assessments of fear and anxiety prior to and during insulin administration in comparison with no intervention.

  • Further research is needed to examine the effectiveness of the devices over a longer time …

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