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Women’s health and midwifery
Impact of stigma on the care of postpartum women with severe mental illness
  1. Daniel Rodger
  1. Allied Health Sciences, London South Bank University, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Mr Daniel Rodger, Allied Health Sciences, London South Bank University School of Health and Social Care, London SE1 0AA, UK; daniel.rodger{at}lsbu.ac.uk

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Commentary on: Ordan R, Shor R, Liebergall-Wischnitzer M, et al. Nurses’ professional stigma and attitudes towards postpartum women with severe mental illness. J Clin Nurs 2018;27:1543–51. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.14179

Implications for practice and research

  • Healthcare professionals should provide person-centred care to postpartum women with severe mental illness (SMI), promoting their autonomy and the best outcomes for the woman and the child.

  • Stigma and negative attitudes towards individuals with SMI can have a detrimental effect on patient care.

  • Future research should evaluate interventions that decrease stigma in healthcare professionals caring for women with SMI.

Context

Healthcare professionals can exhibit stigma and negative attitudes towards individuals with mental illness.1 These negative attitudes influence how they engage with patients with SMI, creating barriers to individualised care. The aim of the study by Ordan et al 2 was to examine …

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