Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Health promotion and public health
Is exercise and yoga a panacea for recovery from sexual violence?: knowing the risks and benefits of yoga and exercise is important
  1. Sinegugu Duma1,2
  1. 1 School of Nursing & Public Health, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa
  2. 2 School of Nursing & Public Health, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa
  1. Correspondence to Prof Sinegugu Duma, School of Nursing & Public Health, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4001, South Africa; Dumas1{at}ukzn.ac.za

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Commentary on: Smith-Marek EN, Baptist J, Lasley C, et al. “I don’t like being that hyperaware of my body”: Women survivors of sexual violence and their experience of exercise. Qual Health Res 2018;28:1692–707. doi: 10.1177/1049732318786482.

Implications for both practice and research

  • The type of exercise that each individual feels comfortable in doing, the stage of recovery and the level of safety one feels at should be established before promoting exercise and yoga for survivors of sexual violence (SV).

  • Further research including the use of randomised controlled trials is needed in order to make conclusive assertions regarding the benefits of exercise and yoga for survivors of SV.

Context

Survivors of SV are confronted by trauma-related consequences including fear, anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. There has been a growth in the promotion of non-pharmacological (NP) …

View Full Text

Footnotes

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.