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Learning disabilities
Adults with intellectual disabilities experience shame that leads to psychological distress and mental illness that requires assessment and treatment
  1. Michael Brown,
  2. Lynne Marsh
  1. School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK
  1. Correspondence to Professor Michael Brown, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK; m.j.brown{at}qub.ac.uk

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Commentary on: Clapton NE, Williams J, Jones RSP. The role of shame in the development and maintenance of psychological distress in adults with intellectual disabilities: a narrative review and synthesis. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil 2017;31:1–17.

Implications for practice and research

  • Adults with intellectual disabilities experience shame contributing to the development and maintenance of psychological distress and mental health problems, which clinicians need to screen for during assessment and provide treatment and support.

  • This literature review developed the understanding of the shaming experiences from the perspective of adults with intellectual disabilities and sets out areas for further research, such as identifying the factors that contribute to shame and interventions and supports that may help.

Context

There is a growing body of research evidence that highlights the stigma and stigmatisation experiences in adults with intellectual …

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