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Instructions for authors

For guidelines on policy and submission across our journals, please click on the links below:
Manuscript preparation
Editorial policies
Patient consent forms
Licence forms
Peer review
Submission and production processes

Editorial Policy

Evidence-Based Nursing surveys a wide range of international medical journals applying strict criteria for the quality and validity of research. Practising clinicians assess the clinical relevance of the best studies. The key details of these essential studies are included in a succinct, informative expert commentary on their clinical application. Published quarterly, Evidence-Based Nursing is designed to alert practising nurses to important and clinically relevant advances in treatment, diagnosis, aetiology, and prognosis.

Article types and word counts

UNFORTUNATELY, EBN DOES NOT ACCEPT UNSOLICITED CONTENT, OR PUBLISH LETTERS IN THE JOURNAL.

Commentaries
These are commissioned only articles. Original papers should not be submitted under this article type unless invited. Commentaries summarise and critically appraise clinically relevant studies that appear in the peer reviewed literature.

The article under review should be described using the following heading structure for the commentaries:

1. Implications for practice and research

  • List the implications for nursing practice of this research
  • List the implications for nursing research in the light of this study

NB This information should be presented in bulleted point form and will be included in a box at the start of the commentary. These should include implications for both research and practice.

2. Context (80-120 words)

The context of the problem addressed by the paper - i.e. the research questions answered; the reason the study was carried out, how many people are affected by this condition, practice setting, country, etc.

3. Methods (100-150 words)

A brief description of the methodology used in the study. Depending on the type of research carried out this should include:

  • Sample
  • Data collection tools
  • Procedure for collecting data (including blinding for RCTs)
  • Methods of data analysis

Please do not include any critique of the methods in this section - any comments on the methods used should be included in the commentary section

4. Findings (75 - 100 words)

A brief description of main findings of the article.

5. Commentary (250-300 words)

In this section you should:

For quantitative studies: comment on the suitability of the methods used and the validity and generalisability of the results.

For qualitative studies: comment on the suitability on the methods used and the strategies used to ensure the credibility, transferability and auditability of the study.

NB avoid using lots of references - a maximum of six should be used.
References follow the Vancouver style.Please do not cite the article you are reviewing, as your commentary will appear on the same page as a declarative title and citation of the article. You may refer to it as (e.g.) "Smith and colleagues screened..." or "This paper follows up..."

Word count: 800 words, including reference list. NB if the word count is exceeded you will be asked to address this before the commentary is accepted for publication.

Abstract: None
Tables/illustrations: none
References: up to 6

Please note abstracts are not required for this article type.

Resources page
These are commissioned only articles. EBN's Resource Pages bring together sources of information about the current evidence for nursing practice.

For guidelines on BMJ Journals policy and submission please click on links below.
Manuscript Formatting
Editorial policies
Patient consent forms
Licence forms
Peer Review Process
Online First process

Supplements

BMJ journals are willing to consider publishing supplements to regular issues. Supplement proposals may be made at the request of:

  • The journal editor, an editorial board member or a learned society may wish to organise a meeting, sponsorship may be sought and the proceedings published as a supplement.
  • The journal editor, editorial board member or learned society may wish to commission a supplement on a particular theme or topic. Again, sponsorship may be sought.
  • The BMJ itself may have proposals for supplements where sponsorship may be necessary.
  • A sponsoring organisation, often a pharmaceutical company or a charitable foundation, that wishes to arrange a meeting, the proceedings of which will be published as a supplement.

In all cases, it is vital that the journal's integrity, independence and academic reputation is not compromised in any way.

When contacting us regarding a potential supplement, please include as much of the information below as possible.

  • Journal in which you would like the supplement published
  • Title of supplement and/or meeting on which it is based
  • Date of meeting on which it is based
  • Proposed table of contents with provisional article titles and proposed authors
  • An indication of whether authors have agreed to participate
  • Sponsor information including any relevant deadlines
  • An indication of the expected length of each paper Guest Editor proposals if appropriate

For further information on criteria that must be fulfilled, download the supplements guidelines (PDF).

  • Critique the methods used and/or the authors' conclusions: What could or should the authors have done differently?
  • Compare the findings to past literature: How does this research fit with previous work in this area; what is new, innovative or different? Do the findings support or conflict with those from other studies?
    1. The journal editor, an editorial board member or a learned society may wish to organise a meeting, sponsorship may be sought and the proceedings published as a supplement.
    2. The journal editor, editorial board member or learned society may wish to commission a supplement on a particular theme or topic. Again, sponsorship may be sought.
    3. The BMJ itself may have proposals for supplements where sponsorship may be necessary.
    4. A sponsoring organisation, often a pharmaceutical company or a charitable foundation, that wishes to arrange a meeting, the proceedings of which will be published as a supplement.
    5. Journal in which you would like the supplement published
    6. Title of supplement and/or meeting on which it is based
    7. Date of meeting on which it is based
    8. Proposed table of contents with provisional article titles and proposed authors
    9. An indication of whether authors have agreed to participate
    10. Sponsor information including any relevant deadlines
    11. An indication of the expected length of each paper Guest Editor proposals if appropriate

Plagiarism detection

BMJ is a member of CrossCheck by CrossRef and iThenticate. iThenticate is a plagiarism screening service that verifies the originality of content submitted before publication. iThenticate checks submissions against millions of published research papers, and billions of web content. Authors, researchers and freelancers can also use iThenticate to screen their work before submission by visiting www.ithenticate.com.

Free Sample

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