eLetters

21 e-Letters

  • Legalising Assisted Dying
    Harriet M Copperman OBE, SRN

    Dear Editor,

    I began practising palliative care in the community in the mid 1970's and retired nearly 25 years later, having been involved with the care of thousands of dying patients. We were evangelical in our attempts to teach and spread the 'gospel of palliative care' to professionals, students and lay people, in the UK and around the world. We thought it was the answer to enabling people to have a good death....

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  • Nurses can help improve secondary cardiovascular prevention
    Helene R. Voogdt-Pruis

    Koelewijn-van Loon commented on our study, a pragmatic randomised trial of the clinical effectiveness of nurses as substitutes for GPs in cardiovascular risk management. In our study, we found a greater decrease in the mean value of risk factors in the practice nurse group than in the GP group, but after confounders and baseline risk factors were controlled for, a statistically significant decrease was found only for tot...

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  • Seclusion: treatment or punishment?
    Thomas M. Fraser

    Dear Editor,

    As a Mental Health Nurse of some 30 years practice I wish to compliment Helen Kirkpatrick on her insightful article regarding the primarily counter-therapeutic effects seclusion has in the overall treatment of the mentally ill person.

    As an RN working in a state run facility I can personally attest to a horrible treatment plan that was referred to as "Voluntary Open Quiet Room". During the cou...

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  • Catching up with the times
    Julia Wyatt

    Dear Editor,

    I was so glad when my daughter, also a nurse, found this piece of research. I note with sadness the date - 2001.

    I live in the wilds of Essex, at least 25 miles from the great 'metropolis'. Two years ago I had a vile stroke, so I no longer drive. Recently 'they' noticed that I had AF and must start on anticoagulant treatment instantly. There is a proudly "Nurse led Clinic" at a hospital some h...

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  • Author's Reply
    Andrew Jull

    Dear Editor

    Dr Parienti and colleagues have raised concerns [1] about a section of the commentary for which I am responsible. Their letter highlights the lack of a standard typology for trial design in clinical epidemiology. At the heart of this issue is not only what to call the different types of clinical trial, but how to analyse the results of each trial. Was the trial by Dr Parienti and colleagues a cluster randomi...

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  • Only cluster design lead to cluster effect
    Jean-Jacques Parienti

    Dear Editor

    On behalf our Study group, I would like to thank EBN’s Editors for their interest in our work.

    In their review, major concerns regarding the design and analysis of our study were raised by Drs Moralejo and Jull, mainly because antiseptic protocols were randomised by services (called "clusters") but outcome was analysed by patients. The authors concluded that while our trial is intriguing, "whether...

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  • Nicky Callum
    We would like to thank Carlos Kusano Bucalen Ferrari for taking the time to respond to the Commentary by Violeta Ribeiro (EBN 2002; 5:57). Mr Ferrari gives us an interesting overview of the biochemical effects of several antioxidants in laboratory studies. These kinds of studies are frequently the starting point for developing new drugs and treatments but it is important to emphasise that the results of in vitro studies in labo...
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  • Carlos K B Ferrari
    Dear Editor

    It is well documented that Free radicals (FRs) and their Oxidative Reactions are implicated in more than 70 diseases and disorders [1,2], including inflammatory reactions, such as alergies and rheumatoid arthritis. As FRs and Oxidative stress are also implicated in many cell death processes [3], many scientific activities are being done to discover possible protective effects of the antioxidant therapy [1]. Today...

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  • The significance of needle gauge
    Wendy Mullins

    Dear Editors

    Consideration has not been given to the significance of the larger bore needle (23 gauge) affecting the outcome, seperate to the length of the needle. Surely, to exclude this variable by comparing 25mm x 23 gauge, 25mm x 25 gauge, and 16mm x 25 gauge would possibly clarify the significance of the larger bore needle rather than assume the longer length needle as being the sole variant?

  • Editors' Reply to eLetter from JC Platt
    EBM Editors

    Dear Mr Platt

    Many thanks for your eLetter regarding an abstract appearing in both EBM[1] and EBN[2] with different commentaries. In answer to your queries:
    First, when we have the same abstract appearing in both journals we do sometimes use the same commentary as well, however, if we think it doesn't fit our target audience we can require a fresh commentary. The risk is that, like all opinion, diff...

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