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Parent–infant room-sharing is complex and important for breastfeeding
  1. Kristin P Tully,
  2. Catherine S Sullivan
  1. Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute, Department of Maternal and Child Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Kristin P Tully, Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute, Department of Maternal and Child Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; kristin.tully{at}unc.edu

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Commentary on: Paul IM, Hohman EE, Loken E, et al. Motherinfant room-sharing and sleep outcomes in the INSIGHT study. Pediatrics 2017;140:e20170122.

Implications for practice and research

  • Solitary infant sleep and early consolidation of infant sleep are not biologically appropriate.

  • In practice, judgement around infant sleep may create stigma and limit productive patient-provider engagement, a trademark of family-centred care.

  • Effective communication of risk reduction strategies for night-time parenting is vital.

  • Sleep research with biological measures integrated with observations, actigraphy and qualitative data is needed.

Context

Night-time parenting is a critical part of life that is understudied. The need to improve the evidence base for health recommendations so that parents have improved opportunity for informed decision-making is urgent. Currently, too little attention is paid to safe postpartum interactions. Mothers are cautious about reporting issues such as infant sleep in clinical visits.1 Fear-based messaging about infant sleep locations can …

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