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Qualitative synthesis
Formal carers providing end-of-life care and bereavement support to people with intellectual disabilities have unmet learning needs
  1. Dorry McLaughlin
  1. School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen’s University, Belfast, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Dorry McLaughlin, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen’s University, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK; d.mclaughlin{at}qub.ac.uk

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Commentary on: Lord A, Field S, Smith IC. The experiences of staff who support people with intellectual disability on issues about death, dying and bereavement: a metasynthesis. Journal of Allied Intellectual Disability Research 2017;30:1007-1021.

Implications for practice and research

  • Unmet learning needs exist among staff supporting people with intellectual disabilities at end of life and in bereavement, which should be addressed within care settings.

  • There is evidence that partnership working between intellectual disability and palliative care services can enable the end-of-life care needs of people with intellectual disabilities to be more effectively assessed and addressed.

  • Further studies are required to explore staff experiences in supporting people with intellectual disabilities in these sensitive issues.

Context

Research studies evidence that staff in both intellectual disability and palliative care services lack confidence, …

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