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Cross-sectional study
Paediatric intensive care nurses report higher empathy but also higher burnout than other health professionals
  1. Gillian Colville
  1. Paediatric Psychology Service, St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Gillian Colville, Paediatric Psychology Service, St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; gcolvill{at}sgul.ac.uk

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Commentary on: Latimer M, Jackson PL, Eugène F, et al. Empathy in paediatric intensive care nurses part 1: behavioural and psychological correlates. J Adv Nurs 2017 [Epub ahead of print 11 May 2017] . doi: 10.1111/jan.13333.

Implications for practice and research

  • Intensive care nurses should be provided with advice on how to care for their own psychological well-being at work given their regular exposure to traumatic events.

  • Further research could establish whether the associations found between exposure to patients’ pain, staff distress and overestimation of pain apply to other nursing groups.

Context

A recent increase in the number of publications on the high prevalence of burnout and moral distress in health professionals in general, and in critical care staff in particular, has led to a call for more research …

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