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Randomised controlled trial
Family-centred advanced care planning with adolescents living with HIV is perceived as important, helpful and meaningful
  1. Lori Wiener1,
  2. Abby R Rosenberg2
  1. 1National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
  2. 2Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Lori Wiener, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA; wienerl{at}mail.nih.gov

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Commentary on: Dallas RH, Kimmel A, Wilkins ML, et al. Acceptability of family-centered advanced care planning for adolescents with HIV. Pediatrics 2016;138: pii: e20161854.

Implications for practice and research

  • While talking about advance care planning (ACP) with adolescents living with HIV may elicit strong emotions, these conversations are perceived as important, helpful and meaningful.

  • Future studies would benefit from a tool that assesses readiness and interventions that increase comfort in having ACP discussions with adolescents and their families.

Context

There is limited information regarding advance care planning (ACP) discussions among adolescents compared with adults living with chronic and life-limiting conditions. Despite policy recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Institute of Medicine to provide adolescents the opportunity to express their preferences about end-of-life (EOL) care, these conversations often occur too late. Barriers include a belief that such conversations cause …

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