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Cross-sectional study
Good peer relationships can attenuate the negative effect of horizontal violence on job satisfaction
  1. Judith M Horrigan
  1. Laurentian University School of Nursing and the Centre for Research in Occupational Safety and Health (CROSH), Sudbury, Ontario, Canada
  1. Correspondence to: Professor Judith M Horrigan, Laurentian University School of Nursing and the Centre for Research in Occupational Safety and Health (CROSH), 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6; jhorrigan{at}laurentian.ca

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Implications for practice and research

  • Key variables in the work environment, such as supportive peer relationships, can help to mediate the negative effects of horizontal violence and improve nurses’ job satisfaction.

  • Future research should focus on intervention studies to evaluate strategies created and implemented to address incivility and horizontal violence in nurses’ practice environments.

Context

The perceptions of job satisfaction and the experience of horizontal violence among registered nurses (RNs) are two key concerns that have been researched over several decades. Evidence has suggested that horizontal violence and job satisfaction among nurses are negatively associated with several factors including peer relationships. This study by Purpora and colleague specifically aimed to describe …

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