Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Survey
Daily e-cigarette use increases quit attempts and reduces smoking with no effect on cessation
  1. Felix Naughton
  1. Behavioural Science Group, Institute of Public Health, Forvie Site, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
  1. Correspondence to : Dr Felix Naughton, Behavioural Science Group, Institute of Public Health, Forvie Site, University of Cambridge, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0SR, UK; fmen2{at}medschl.cam.ac.uk

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Commentary on: OpenUrlCrossRefPubMed

Implications for practice and research

  • Daily e-cigarette users are more likely to reduce and attempt to quit tobacco smoking than non-users, but are no more likely to report abstinence.

  • Improved measurement of e-cigarette use in future observational studies will improve our understanding of the relationship between e-cigarettes and smoking cessation.

Context

In the UK, peak increases in e-cigarette usage from 2013 to 20141 correspond broadly with a national increase in cessation of tobacco.2 An important question is whether e-cigarette use may cause a reduction in smoking. Brose and colleagues sought to address a key element of this question: whether …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.