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Systematic review
Review suggests mobile phone interventions improve medication adherence; rigorous longer term studies are needed to confirm effects
  1. Petra A Wark1,
  2. Josip Car1,2
  1. 1Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London, School of Public Health, London, UK;
  2. 2Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Imperial College & Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Petra A Wark, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London, School of Public Health, The Reynolds Building, St Dunstan's Road, London W6 8RP, UK; p.wark{at}imperial.ac.uk

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Implications for practice and research

  • Mobile phone text reminders can improve medication adherence. As user satisfaction is generally high, negative effects may not be observed and costs can be low, therefore, nurses should promote their use.

  • Future mobile phone medication reminders should be individually tailored, be based on health behavioural theories and supported by well-designed (adaptive) randomised controlled trials (RCTs).

Context

Around 50% of patients do not take their medication as prescribed.1–3 Medication non-adherence may decrease productivity and put lives at risks, as well as wastes resources and increases healthcare costs. It may be intentional (eg, the patient questions the benefit of the therapy or has side effects) or …

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