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Cross-sectional study
Physical and sexual intimate partner violence negatively affects women's mental health and their children's behaviour
  1. Megan R Holmes
  1. Case Western Reserve University, Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Megan R Holmes, Case Western Reserve University, Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, 11235 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106-7164, USA; mholmes{at}case.edu

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Implications for practice and research

  • Screening for intimate partner violence (IPV) may help connect women to support services, which may in turn reduce the risk of death related to IPV.

  • Research should continue to explore the effect of physical and sexual IPV on women and children's health outcomes.

Context

Seven million women each year experience physical, sexual or psychological abuse by an intimate partner and approximately 16% of children are exposed to IPV (also known as domestic violence) during their lifetime.1 ,2 Women who experience IPV report more mental …

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