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Qualitative synthesis
Clarification of the common aspects of dignity in end-of-life care
  1. Gabriella Trussardi,
  2. Merryn Gott
  1. Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, School of Nursing, Auckland, New Zealand
  1. Correspondence to: Professor Merryn Gott, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, School of Nursing, Private Bag 92019, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142, New Zealand; m.gott{at}auckland.ac.nz

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Implications for practice and research

  • The paper has significant implications for policy and practice given the increasing mention of ‘dignity’ as a preferred outcome for healthcare, particularly within a palliative and end-of-life care context.

  • The findings point clearly to a need for future research to develop a more nuanced understanding of dignity which takes into account cultural differences in how the term is understood.

Context

A key aim of palliative care is to provide patient-centred care that encompasses both the person at their end of life and those they are emotionally close to. In this frame the purpose of palliative care …

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