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Randomised controlled trial
Self-monitoring and self-titration of antihypertensive medication reduces systolic blood pressure compared with usual care
  1. Hayden B Bosworth1,2,
  2. Matthew J Crowley1,3
  1. 1Durham VA Medical Center, Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham, North Carolina, USA;
  2. 2Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA;
  3. 3Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Hayden B Bosworth, Durham VA Medical Center, Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham, NC, USA; hayden.bosworth{at}duke.edu

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Implications for practice and research

  • Individuals randomised to blood pressure (BP) self-monitoring and antihypertensive medication self-titration have clinically meaningful reductions in BP relative to usual care.

  • This study represents a significant advance in hypertension self-management in high-risk patient groups, but the intervention's potential for wide implementation remains unclear.

Context

Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, stroke, heart failure and chronic kidney disease.1 Effective treatment reduces risk for these devastating complications, but BP remains insufficiently controlled in up to half …

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