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Of women seeking assistance for intimate partner violence, those who report victimization during pregnancy are at higher risk of further victimization
  1. Julianne C Flanagan
  1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA
  1. Correspondence to : Dr Julianne Flanagan, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 5 Charleston Center Dr, Suite 151, Charleston, SC 29401, USA; hellmuth{at}musc.edu

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Implications for practice and research

  • The benefits of integrating regular intimate partner violence (IPV) screening procedures for pregnant women in clinical settings outweigh the cost of minimal time spent conducting assessments.

  • Healthcare providers must be trained to conduct IPV assessments and provide treatment referrals.

  • Future studies should use larger samples and compare shelter populations with general prenatal care.

Context

Existing literature demonstrates a robust association between IPV victimisation during pregnancy and the following: continued risk for IPV victimisation; mental and physical health problems among mothers; physical and developmental health problems for infants and children.1 ,2 Recent literature …

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