rss
Evid Based Nurs doi:10.1136/eb-2014-101786
  • Child health
  • Systematic review and meta-analysis

Exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in late pregnancy increases the risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, but the absolute risk is low

  1. Marlene P Freeman2
  1. 1Department of Psychiatry and Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Massachusetts Medical School/UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA;
  2. 2Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Nancy Byatt, Department of Psychiatry and Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Massachusetts Medical School/UMass Memorial Medical Center, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA; nancy.byatt{at}umassmemorial.org

Commentary on:

Implications for practice and research

  • Persistent pulmonary hypertension in newborns (PPHN) is rare and, despite a small increased risk when selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used in late pregnancy, the absolute risk of PPHN remains low.

  • Considering the risk of relapse into depression, the available evidence does not support discontinuation of SSRIs during pregnancy due to concerns about PPHN.

  • Future research needs to consistently either examine or control for factors that may be associated with PPHN, including treatments for underlying maternal psychiatric illness.

Context

Depression in pregnancy is common and has adverse effects on birth outcomes, mother–infant attachment, and the behaviour and development of infants and children.1–4 While effective …

No Related Web Pages

Free Sample

This recent issue is free to all users to allow everyone the opportunity to see the full scope and typical content of EBN.
View free sample issue >>

EBN Journal Chat

The EBN Journal Chat offers readers the opportunity to participate in discussion about research articles and commentaries from Evidence Based Nursing (EBN).

How to participate >>

Don't forget to sign up for content alerts so you keep up to date with all the articles as they are published.

Navigate This Article