Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Systematic review
Findings from qualitative studies suggest parents of children with disabilities benefit from peer support; whereas findings from quantitative studies are inconclusive
  1. Lutz Goldbeck
  1. Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychotherapy, University of Ulm Medical Centre, Ulm, Germany
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Lutz Goldbeck, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychotherapy, University of Ulm Medical Centre, Krankenhausweg 3, Ulm D-89075, Germany; lutz.goldbeck{at}uniklinik-ulm.de

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Commentary on: OpenUrlCrossRefPubMed

Implications for practice and research

  • Qualitative research suggests shared social identity, learning from others, personal growth and supporting others are key ingredients of peer support for parents of children with disabling conditions.

  • Evidence for the efficacy of peer support for parents is limited due to the methodical challenges of undertaking controlled studies in this field.

  • Future research should aim to identify factors of effective peer support and its utilisation in healthcare settings.

Context

Healthcare professionals routinely recommend peer support for parents of children with long-term and disabling conditions. Peer support comprises of parent groups and one-to-one parent support in the absence of a healthcare professional or facilitator. Unlike …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.