rss
Evid Based Nurs doi:10.1136/eb-2013-101552
  • Child health
  • Systematic review

Findings from qualitative studies suggest parents of children with disabilities benefit from peer support; whereas findings from quantitative studies are inconclusive

  1. Lutz Goldbeck
  1. Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychotherapy, University of Ulm Medical Centre, Ulm, Germany
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Lutz Goldbeck, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychotherapy, University of Ulm Medical Centre, Krankenhausweg 3, Ulm D-89075, Germany; lutz.goldbeck{at}uniklinik-ulm.de

Commentary on:

Implications for practice and research

  • Qualitative research suggests shared social identity, learning from others, personal growth and supporting others are key ingredients of peer support for parents of children with disabling conditions.

  • Evidence for the efficacy of peer support for parents is limited due to the methodical challenges of undertaking controlled studies in this field.

  • Future research should aim to identify factors of effective peer support and its utilisation in healthcare settings.

Context

Healthcare professionals routinely recommend peer support for parents of children with long-term and disabling conditions. Peer support comprises of parent groups and one-to-one parent support in the absence of a healthcare professional or facilitator. Unlike …

This article has not yet been cited by other articles.

Free Sample

This recent issue is free to all users to allow everyone the opportunity to see the full scope and typical content of EBN.
View free sample issue >>

EBN Journal Chat

The EBN Journal Chat offers readers the opportunity to participate in discussion about research articles and commentaries from Evidence Based Nursing (EBN).

How to participate >>

Don't forget to sign up for content alerts so you keep up to date with all the articles as they are published.

Navigate This Article