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People hospitalised on acute psychiatric wards report mixed feelings of safety and vulnerability
  1. Eimear Muir-Cochrane,
  2. Adam Gerace
  1. Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Eimear Muir-Cochrane, Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia; eimear.muircochrane{at}flinders.edu.au

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Implications for practice and research

  • Patients expect to be cared for and kept safe by nurses. They feel physically safer when male nurses are present and feel vulnerable among fellow patients.

  • Nurses need to be sensitive to the experience of hospitalisation and need to provide physical and emotional safety for all inpatients through close engagement with them.

  • Further research is needed to explore the factors that promote feelings of being safe and recovery in acute inpatient units.

Context

The experience of psychiatric inpatient hospitalisation has received increasing scrutiny over recent years. Risk to self or others is usually the core reason for …

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