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Evid Based Nurs doi:10.1136/eb-2013-101708
  • Child health
  • Mixed methods

Although parents are generally satisfied with their child's postoperative care, children continue to experience moderate-to-severe pain postoperatively

  1. Elizabeth Manias
  1. The University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Health Sciences, Carlton, Victoria, Australia
  1. Correspondence to: Professor Elizabeth Manias, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Health Sciences, Level 7, 161 Barry Street, Parkville, Carlton, VIC 3010, Australia; emanias{at}unimelb.edu.au

Commentary on:

Implications for practice and research

  • Hospitalised children continue to experience moderate-to-severe pain following surgery.

  • Nurses should negotiate pain-relieving goals with children and parents, and regularly review whether goals have been met.

  • Further research is needed to examine the impact of organisational culture on pain assessment and management in children.

Context

Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines, children continue to experience moderate-to-severe pain following surgery.1 ,2 Children's pain is not managed effectively by nurses for many reasons including: nurses not always evaluating the effectiveness of pain-relieving interventions; and nurses’ perception that particular procedures are associated with some level of expected pain, rather assessing pain and listening to children. Furthermore, parents and children may be uncomfortable about raising concerns in how the child's pain is managed.

Parents’ beliefs can also hinder the management of their child's pain because of fears about their child experiencing unpleasant …

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