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Systematic review
Few people living with and beyond cancer meet current exercise recommendations
  1. Denise Spector
  1. Duke University Medical Center, Duke Cancer Institute and Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina, USA
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Denise Spector, Duke University Medical Center, Duke Cancer Institute and Duke University School of Nursing, 109 Seeley Mudd Building, Durham, NC 27710, USA; denise.spector{at}duke.edu

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Implications for practice and research

  • Cancer survivors benefit from regular exercise, therefore it is important that oncology nurses are knowledgeable about interventions that help patients increase and sustain exercise.

  • Oncology nurses should also be aware of the limitations of current research when designing effective behavioural interventions aimed at promoting habitual exercise.

Context

An estimated 29 million individuals are living with a cancer diagnosis worldwide.1 Cancer survivors often experience adverse effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and many are at increased risk for recurrence, secondary malignancies and comorbidities.2 ,3 Exercise among cancer survivors has been found to be safe, well tolerated and has a positive effect on cardiorespiratory fitness, fatigue, anxiety, depression, …

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