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Case control study
People with schizophrenia are more likely to have a mother who smoked during pregnancy than people without the condition
  1. Marie D Cornelius
  1. Department of Psychiatry and Epidemiology, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
  1. Correspondence to: Professor Marie D Cornelius, Department of Psychiatry and Epidemiology, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA; mdc1{at}pitt.edu

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Implications for practice and research

  • Women who smoke during pregnancy expose their offspring to toxins, which may affect their immediate and long-term development.

  • Research should continue to explore the potential long-term impact that prenatal tobacco exposure (PTE) may have on developmental outcomes including psychiatric disorders.

Context

Tobacco is one of the most common substances used during pregnancy.1 Gestational smoking exposure is associated with obstetric abnormalities and low birthweight,2 which may lead to developmental disorders in childhood,3 as well as later risk factors for psychiatric disorders. In addition to genetic factors, environmental factors may play a role in the aetiology of psychotic …

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