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Evid Based Nurs doi:10.1136/eb-2013-101283
  • Nursing issues
  • Randomised controlled trial

Whether nitrofurazone-impregnated catheters have a clinically important impact on the risk of UTI compared to standard catheters is uncertain, but they may be cost-effective for the NHS

  1. Jacqui Prieto
  1. Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hampshire, UK
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Jacqui Prieto
    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, Level A, South Academic Block (MP 11), Southampton General Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton, Hampshire SO16 6YD, UK; J.A.Prieto{at}soton.ac.uk

Commentary on: Pickard R, Lam T, Maclennan G, et al. Types of urethral catheter for reducing symptomatic urinary tract infections in hospitalised adults requiring short-term catheterisation: a multicentre randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of antimicrobial- and antiseptic-impregnated urethral catheters (the CATHETER trial). Health Technol Assess 2012;16:1–197.

Implications for practice and research

  • This study provides evidence that antimicrobial urethral catheters may not benefit patients admitted to hospital for elective surgery and therefore standard catheters are recommended.

  • Further research is needed to determine whether antimicrobial urethral catheters would benefit patients hospitalised for medical or critical care reasons.

Context

Around 25% of the hospitalised patients undergo short-term indwelling catheterisation,1 which accounts for up to 80% of healthcare-associated urinary tract infection (UTI).2 The incidence of bacteriuria (bacterial contamination of urine) among catheterised patients is approximately 5% per day1 and infection is estimated to develop in one quarter of patients with bacteriuria.1 …

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