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Systematic review and meta-analysis
Physical training is well tolerated, leads to improvements in cardiopulmonary fitness and is not associated with adverse outcomes in people with asthma
  1. Shilpa Dogra
  1. Department of Kinesiology, School of Recreation Management and Kinesiology, Acadia University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada
  1. Correspondence to: Shilpa Dogra
    Department of Kinesiology, School of Recreation Management and Kinesiology, Acadia University, 550 Main St, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada B4P2R6; shilpa.dogra{at}acadiau.ca

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Commentary on: Chandratilleke MG, Carson KV, Picot J, et al. Physical training for asthma. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2012;5:CD001116

Implications for practice and research

  1. Regular physical activity (PA) should be recommended to those with well-controlled asthma as it leads to improvements in aerobic capacity, quality of life (QOL) and asthma symptoms.

  2. Regular PA is safe for those with well-controlled asthma.

  3. Randomised trials of efficacy and effectiveness must be conducted in order to determine the optimal dose and mode of PA for those with asthma.

Context

Asthma affects 8–9% of the population in the UK. Exercise acts as a trigger for acute bronchoconstriction in approximately 80% of those with asthma.1 As such, people with asthma tend to avoid PA.1 In addition to many benefits of engaging in PA, regular exercise may lead to significant improvements in asthma control.2 This exercise …

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