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Systematic review with meta-analysis
Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome
  1. Jackie Sturt
  1. Health Sciences Research Institute, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
  1. Correspondence to: Jackie Sturt
    Health Sciences Research Institute, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK; jackie.sturt{at}warwick.ac.uk

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Sugary drink consumption associated with obesity

The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) has increased worldwide in the last four decades. In the USA, there has been a twofold increase, and in developing countries such as India and China, Coca Cola reported a 14% and 18% sales increase respectively in 2007 alone. The list of sugar-sweetened drinks comprises sodas or fizzy drinks, fruit drinks and energy and vitamin water drinks and excludes 100% fruit juices not blended with sweetening agents such as sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup or fruit juice concentrates. Health experts are calling for a reduction in consumption of SSBs because of the increasing evidence of association between SSB consumption and obesity in children and adults.1 Furthermore, association between habitual SSB consumption and metabolic …

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