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Evid Based Nurs 7:54 doi:10.1136/ebn.7.2.54
  • Treatment

Cognitive stimulation therapy improved cognition and quality of life in dementia


 
 Q In people with dementia, does cognitive stimulation therapy (CST) improve cognition and quality of life?

METHODS

GraphicDesign:

randomised controlled trial.

GraphicAllocation:

concealed.

GraphicBlinding:

blinded (outcome assessor).

GraphicFollow up period:

7 weeks.

GraphicSetting:

5 day centres and 18 residential homes (with ⩾15 people in each) in the UK.

GraphicPatients:

201 people (mean age 85 y, 79% women) who met DSM-IV criteria for dementia, scored 10–24 on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), were able to communicate (according the Clifton Assessment Procedures for the Elderly—Behaviour Rating Scale), had sufficient vision and hearing to participate and use material in a group, and did not have major physical illness or disability (including learning disability).

GraphicInterventions:

CST (n = 115): fourteen 45 minute sessions twice a week for 7 weeks. The programme used the concepts of reality orientation and cognitive stimulation and included the topics of money, word games, the present day, and famous faces. “Usual activities” (n = 86): in most settings, this consisted of doing nothing.

GraphicOutcomes:

cognition (MMSE), quality of life (Quality of Life–Alzheimer’s Disease Scale), communication (Holden Communication Scale), behaviour (Clifton Assessment Procedures for the Elderly–Behaviour Rating Scale), global functioning (Clinical Dementia Rating Scale), depression (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia), and anxiety (Rating Anxiety in Dementia).

GraphicPatient follow up:

83%.

MAIN RESULTS

Analysis was by intention to …

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