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Cohort study
Parents who are aware when they are overweight themselves are more likely to recognise this in their children
  1. Alison Jeffery
  1. Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Clinical Trials and Population Studies, Plymouth, UK
  1. Correspondence to : Dr Alison Jeffery, Plymouth University and Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Clinical Trials and Population Studies, Plymouth Science Park Phase 1, Plymouth PL6 8BX, UK; alison.jeffery{at}plymouth.ac.uk

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Implications for practice and research

  • Making parents aware of their own weight category may help them recognise overweight in their children.

  • Nurses should plot children's body mass index on growth charts rather than relying on maternal perception as the trigger to initiate weight-management measures.

  • Parents may perceive slim, healthy children as underweight.

  • Intervention studies are needed to test whether raising awareness and offering lifestyle change affects the trajectory of weight gain.

  • Studies should concentrate on those most at risk—younger children and those just overweight.

  • We need better understanding of the potential moderators—ethnicity, parental …

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