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Mixed methods study
Professionals providing cervical screening may require training and support on how to provide safe and sensitive care for survivors of childhood sexual abuse
  1. Louise Cadman
  1. Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Centre for Cancer Prevention, Queen Mary University of London, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to : Louise Cadman, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Centre for Cancer Prevention, Queen Mary University of London, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK; l.cadman{at}qmul.ac.uk

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Implications for practice and research

  • Incorporating education around childhood sexual abuse (CSA) into training for clinicians who conduct cervical screening would enable them to be more competent and confident with women exposed to CSA.

  • Further research should involve an evaluation of competence, confidence and impact on women, where training incorporates CSA.

Context

This service evaluation explores the challenges and training needs of clinicians who conduct cervical screening for women who have experienced CSA. Evidence suggests that women exposed to CSA are more likely to suffer from cervical cancer and are less likely to attend regular cervical …

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