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Quantitative study—systematic review
Non-pharmacological approaches for pain relief during labour can improve maternal satisfaction with childbirth and reduce obstetric interventions
  1. Leanne V Jones
  1. Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool Women's NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK
  1. Correspondence to : Leanne V Jones, Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, First Floor, Liverpool Women's NHS Foundation Trust, Crow Street, Liverpool, L8 7SS, UK; l.v.jones{at}liv.ac.uk

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Implications for practice and research

  • Most non-pharmacological methods of pain management are non-invasive and appear to provide benefits, and are safe for the mother and baby.

  • In future trials, usual care needs to be more clearly defined and relevant outcomes such as measures of pain need to be assessed.

  • Caregivers need to gain expertise in the use of non-pharmacological pain relief techniques so that they can be better integrated into practice within hospital settings.

Context

Women experience pain of differing intensities during labour and this pain intensity can be affected by many physiological and psychosocial factors. Most women require some form of pain relief and pain management, …

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