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Cohort study
Children with poor adherence to antiepileptic drugs during the first 6 months of treatment are less likely to be seizure free after 4 years
  1. J Helen Cross
  1. Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University College London, Institute of Child Health, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to : Professor J Helen Cross, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University College London, Institute of Child Health, 4/5 Long Yard, London WC1N 3LU, UK;h.cross{at}ucl.ac.uk

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Implications for practice and research

  • Early adherence to antiepileptic medication is related to long-term seizure outcome.

  • Interventions to enhance medication adherence may have a role in improving long-term seizure outcome in children with epilepsy.

  • Further studies are needed with larger sample sizes to address the limitations of the study.

Context

Epilepsy has a prevalence of 1% in children, but is an umbrella term for a range of conditions characterised by recurrent epileptic seizures. Primary treatment for epilepsy is antiepileptic drugs (AED) that suppress the occurrence of seizures but are not thought to influence the natural history of the condition. Although two-thirds of children will respond to medication or enter spontaneous remission over time, one-third of children continue to have seizures …

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