rss
Evid Based Nurs 17:15-16 doi:10.1136/eb-2013-101234
  • Child health
  • Cross-sectional study

British secondary school students report frequent abdominal pain with associated physical and emotional symptoms

  1. Miguel Saps
  1. Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  1. Correspondence to : Dr Miguel Saps
    Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 225 E Chicago Avenue, Box 65, Chicago, IL 60611, USA; msaps{at}luriechildrens.org

Commentary on:

Implications for practice and research

  • Abdominal pain is common in children, and frequently associated with anxiety, depression, school absenteeism and physical complaints such as headache and limb pain.

  • Assessment and treatment of children with abdominal pain should be underpinned by a biopsychosocial approach.

  • Functional abdominal pain research should use standardised research tools and definitions such as the Rome III criteria.

Context

Between 20% and 40% of school children have weekly abdominal pain accounting for 2–4% of childhood medical consultations in the USA.1 ,2 Most abdominal pain is functional; no anatomical, biochemical or structural abnormalities are found. The health system burden and impairment of affected children remains poorly understood. Studies cannot …

No Related Web Pages

Free Sample

This recent issue is free to all users to allow everyone the opportunity to see the full scope and typical content of EBN.
View free sample issue >>

EBN Journal Chat

The EBN Journal Chat offers readers the opportunity to participate in discussion about research articles and commentaries from Evidence Based Nursing (EBN).

How to participate >>

Don't forget to sign up for content alerts so you keep up to date with all the articles as they are published.

Navigate This Article