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Evid Based Nurs 16:113-114 doi:10.1136/eb-2012-101163
  • Primary health care
  • Systematic review and meta-analysis

Updated systematic review suggests that cranberry juice is not effective at preventing urinary tract infection

Editor's Choice
  1. Amy B Howell
  1. Rutgers University, Marucci Center for Blueberry Cranberry Research, Chatsworth, New Jersey, USA
  1. Correspondence to : Dr Amy B Howell
    Rutgers University, Marucci Center for Blueberry Cranberry Research, 125 A Lake Oswego Road, Chatsworth, NJ 08019, USA; ahowell{at}aesop.rutgers.edu

Commentary on:

Implications for practice and research

  • Not all cranberry products contain enough active proanthocyanidins (PACs) for clinical efficacy. Consumers should look for products containing 36 mg of PACs.

  • Cranberry is nearly as effective as low-dose antibiotics for urinary tract infection (UTI) prevention in women and children and does not cause antibiotic resistance.

  • If cranberry products are being recommended to patients, conclusions of this one review do not provide sufficient reasons to change current practices.

Context

UTIs are a significant public health challenge with more than 15 million cases in the USA each year, with their treatment accounting for 15% of all community-prescribed antibiotics at a cost of $500 million annually. For decades, cranberry juice and powders have been routinely recommended by healthcare practitioners for the prevention of UTIs. Meta-analyses of the clinical studies …

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