rss
Evid Based Nurs 16:58-59 doi:10.1136/eb-2012-100946
  • Pain management
  • Randomised controlled trial

Intravenous analgesia for out-of-hospital traumatic pain in adults: ketamine gives a greater reduction in pain than morphine but causes more adverse effects

  1. William Paul McKay
  1. Department of Anesthesia, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon SK, Saskatchewan Canada
  1. Correspondence to: Dr William Paul McKay
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Saskatchewan, 103 Hospital Drive, Saskatoon SK, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 0W8; bill.mckay{at}usask.ca

Commentary on:

Implications for practice and research

  • Intravenous ketamine has been shown to be useful for acute pain in a variety of settings.1

  • The present study shows that it provides a greater reduction in pain than morphine but causes more adverse effects in out-of-hospital care.

Context

Conscious trauma patients often suffer severe pain. In general, once a head injury has been ruled out, it is safe to give analgesics as promptly as possible.2 Analgesics are often given in the initial out-of-hospital setting, but are often not as effective as they might be. Thus, it is important to …

Free Sample

This recent issue is free to all users to allow everyone the opportunity to see the full scope and typical content of EBN.
View free sample issue >>

EBN Journal Chat

The EBN Journal Chat offers readers the opportunity to participate in discussion about research articles and commentaries from Evidence Based Nursing (EBN).

How to participate >>

Don't forget to sign up for content alerts so you keep up to date with all the articles as they are published.

Navigate This Article