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Evid Based Nurs 14:35 doi:10.1136/ebn1143
  • Adult nursing
  • Systematic review with meta-analysis

Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome

  1. Jackie Sturt
  1. Health Sciences Research Institute, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
  1. Correspondence to Jackie Sturt
    Health Sciences Research Institute, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK; jackie.sturt{at}warwick.ac.uk

Commentary on:

Sugary drink consumption associated with obesity

The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) has increased worldwide in the last four decades. In the USA, there has been a twofold increase, and in developing countries such as India and China, Coca Cola reported a 14% and 18% sales increase respectively in 2007 alone. The list of sugar-sweetened drinks comprises sodas or fizzy drinks, fruit drinks and energy and vitamin water drinks and excludes 100% fruit juices not blended with sweetening agents such as sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup or fruit juice concentrates. Health experts are calling for a reduction …

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